Swatching

I’m always a bit out of date with my posts, they seem to be about a week behind my real time life. When I took this photo, I was knitting swatches for a new cardigan. WHAT?! You say, a NEW large scale knitted project? What about this one? Or that one? Why would you need a whole other new one?

 

Well you know what? I don’t care. Because I looooooove this yarn, and I looooooove this pattern. The yarn is Garnstudios Drops Alpaca, in this bright mossy grassy fresh green, which no photo can really do justice. I’ve used the yarn before in my Stripes and Lace shawl, and it is just lovely to wear. I fell in love with it in my local yarn shop in the Netherlands, and spent ages trying to decide what to knit with it. In fact, I took so long deciding, that when I went to go buy it, the shop had closed for summer break, and would remain closed until I was securely back in New Zealand. Nooooooooooooo! Luckily, I have a good friend there who went back to the yarn shop after I had left, and armed with instructions on choosing balls of the same dye lot, bought it for me and posted it off to New Zealand. 

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In the end, the timing was perfect when this new design from Joji came out. I knitted her Dragonflies jersey as my very first jersey, and I just love her clear style and simple yet effective patterns. The design is called “Make a Wish”, and for those of you not able to view the Ravelry link above, here is one of the photos from the pattern:

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© Joji [Click image for Ravelry pattern page]

Isn’t. That. Lovely? The light airy stitch and loose gauge (20st/inch with fingering weight yarn, for those of you in the know) make it perfect for the alpaca yarn. The drape of this yarn will be just lovely with the swinging ‘train’ of the cardi, and the scarf-like collar. 

 

So! Those are my plans for my lovely green alpaca yarn. And as I said, I am a bit behind and I have, in fact, already cast on and knitted 30 rows! Unfortunately, the combination of Wellington weather (rain! storms!), the provisional cast-on and subsequent stockingette (rolling up like no-one’s business!) mean that photographing it is near impossible… So you shall have to wait!

 

 

 

Learning

Learning

I forgot to post this photo after I took it….

It’s my Mum, learning how to knit socks on DPNs, from the toe up. It’s her first ever pair of socks, and the first time knitting in the round, and she’s doing awesomely!

Just before I left to come back to Wellington, we did the short rows to turn the heel of one sock. She is knitting two socks at (nearly) one time, on two sets of DPNs. This is especially good for a learner, and anyone really, because it means that, for example, you don’t knit all of one sock, then come back to the toe of the other and go ‘How do I do that again?!’.

We chose some Opal self-patterning yarn, which is also fantastic, because it means that although the sock is plain stockingette, there is something interesting and exciting going on in terms of the pattern, too.

Good luck for the next heel turn, Mum!

Recycling

Well, it’s been a busy month or so.

 

At the end of July, I flew back to New Zealand from the Netherlands. I stayed with my mum and dad for a little over a month, and now I am back in the very very very windy Wellington! My knits have been serving me well as I traipse all over town flat-hunting! My little sister and I are searching for a 2 bedroom place together, and it’s not easy! We’ve looked at a couple now, and thought we’d found something ideal until we also found it on the register of “earthquake prone” buildings! Not to worry, the hunt goes on. This afternoon I looked at one with *gasp* insulation, which is more than most draughty cold Welly flats offer! We’ve put in an application for it, so fingers crossed! 

 

I have still been finding a little time for knitting. I’ve cast on a Cape Cod jersey, made from wool which I salvaged from a lovely coloured, but less than fashionable second-hand shop acquisition. Here it is being admired by our cat, Tom. 

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The jersey was knit in pieces, but has been seamed using a sewing machine, which made ripping them out a bit of a challenge! Nevermind, I got there and ended up with a huge pile of curly wool. In the background of this picture you can see the swift that belonged to my Great Grandmother, some socks that I knitted and that my mum claimed, and Tom again – never far from his humans. 

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After a bit of a bath, I hung my swifted skeins out to dry – of course, as soon as I did this it started to rain, so here they are protected by some umbrellas. Genius.

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…Or not genius at all… Luckily they didn’t get too tangled up – even though it looks ominous in this photo!

 

 

 

 

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Cape Cod is a relatively loose-fitting jersey, with a boat neck. I am extremely proud of myself for using short rows to lengthen the back of the neck in comparison to the front (in the pattern, they are the same height). It has one lace panel down the back (top photo), and two in the front (bottom photo). I’ve progressed further since these photos were taken – nearly at the separation of the body from the arms, so I’ll give an update once I’ve done that! 

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